Qutub Minar

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Year : 1198 | State : Delhi | City : Delhi

The adjacent area contains archaeological constructions and mosques like Alai-Darwaza Gate, the masterpiece of Indo-Muslim art, and the Quwwatu’l-Islam. The Qutb complex lies in the middle of the eastern part of Lalkot, the first of the seven cities of Delhi. Building of the Quwwatu’l-Islam which means Might of Islam was built in 1198 by Qutbu’d-Din Aibak, using the demolished remains of Hindu temples after that it was enlarged by Iltutmish and Alauld-Din Khalji.

The Qutb Minar was begun by Qutbu’d-Din Aibak, but completed by his successor, Muhammad-bin-Sam. After some damages in 1326 and 1368, it was repaired by Muhammad-bin-Tughluq and Firuz Shah Tughluq. In 1503 Sikandar Lodi carried out restoration with enlargement of the upper storeys. Among other monuments, the Tomb of Iltutmish was built by the ruler himself while Alai Darwaja was built by Alauld-Din Khalji along with construction of the Alai Minar. The Tomb of Iltutmish is in the north-west corner of the mosque, complimenting a square chamber of red sandstone with a raised platform.

The Qutb Minar is a column built from red and buff sandstone blocks, making it the highest stone tower in India. At present, Qutb has five storeys and each storey is separated from the next by highly decorated balconies and inscribed bands. The Iron Pillar in the Qutb complex is built up of many hundreds of small wrought-iron blooms, 7.02 meter long, and 0.93 meter below ground. The iron pillar in the mosque complex bears a Sanskrit inscription from the 4th century, mentioning a ruler named Chandra, believed to be Chandragupta II. The pillar is made of iron object that has remarkable lack of corrosion, despite the climatic conditions in Delhi.

Map of Qutub Minar